#With_Idlib Part I

Q: Please introduce yourself.

A: My name is Faten, I am 25 years old from Kafranbel, Idlib but now currently live in Maarat Nouman

Q: What is the current situation in Idlib?

A: The situation in Idleb right now is extremely frightening. People are more afraid of what is to come in comparison to the difficulties that we have already endured thus far. The thing we fear most is the airstrikes which is a feeling I cannot describe. At any moment a missile can target your home. And our worry is split between trying to keep ourselves alive and trying to make our children stay alive and safe as well.

  Displaced people from a village in southern Idlib head on the Damascus-Aleppo motorway towards the northern part of the rebel-held province. Photograph: Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images

Displaced people from a village in southern Idlib head on the Damascus-Aleppo motorway towards the northern part of the rebel-held province. Photograph: Omar Haj Kadour/AFP/Getty Images

Q: How has the security situation impacted peoples' daily lives?

A: People are still going to work just because they have to. They need to make sure they have money in order to survive-there is no alternative. No one wants to send their children to school though, it is way too dangerous. There are a few exceptions in some schools as they are pushing through examination periods so that they year doesn’t go to waste.

Q: At least 8 hospitals have been targeted – how are people being treated?

A: Many hospitals are in fact being hit but in a lot of major cities, there is often more than one hospital so what we see is that if on hospital is hit and cannot serve patients, there is a major influx in patients in the nearby hospital.

Q: Idlib was a place of refuge for people that fled Aleppo around this time last year, now those same famiies have become twice displaced – where are people fleeing to now?

A: The majority of IDPs are fleeing to the Turkish-Syrian border but the situation is horrific because of the cold and rain. There are reports of families living under trees because there aren’t enough tents for distribution.

Q: How frequent has the bombardment been – over the last year, Idlib has seen multiple attacks – how is this different?

A: The worst feeling is the feeling of the airplane above our heads. There is no running from them and there is nothing we can do. The only thing we can do is wait and see if the missile will hit us. And if we survive, our house is destroyed.

Q: What can people do to help?

A: The help that we need is emergency relief for the people that have fled to the border including tents and clothing.

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